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Information Mumble Communications in PR

Discussion in 'Guides' started by Disnoxxio, Nov 30, 2014.

  1. Offline
    Disnoxxio Disnoxxio A Thorn in their side.

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    This guide is written by Flix Member and leader of Spearhead, all credits go and belong to Flix

    I get a little bit disturbed by how some SL's use the SL-radio net. Here's a general guide on how to properly use the built-in radio network, aimed at SL, but also useful for SM. Most things will be rather obvious, but that doesn't make it less important. Also, the level of seriousness needed is of course reduced the better you know your team. This guide is meant for situations where you're only playing with unknowns, both SL's and SM's.

    Why care about radio discipline at all?
    This is a valid question. It's a game, not a fucking job, so why should I give a damn about if someone says " We have a tank at my position!" to all SL's, and not something like "Squad 1, this is squad 4, tank reported in H4, kpd 5, over"? I mean, the tank is still there, you just have to check your map to find it.

    It all comes down to reducing the amount of stress for the SL's and to have a reliable way to transfer information.

    As a SL, you have 4 channels of communication to your disposal: Local, squad radio, SL radio and CO radio. This is very handy, and also quite vital for having good teamwork. But, that also means you can have more than 4 different people talking to you at the same time, which, if added to a already intense fire fight, very few can handle. Radio discipline is meant to make communication smooth and efficient and thus make the SL's job a wee bit easier. It also gives the SL a good tool for "queuing" calls, something we'll get back to later.

    How do I use the radio net?
    The built-in Mumble program is actually setup rather nicely be default ("default key"):
    • Local Speech ("H"): For talking to anyone in you vicinity. Good for SM-SM communication, such as contact reports (especially if the squad is split up) or just general banter.
    • Squad Radio ("Num 0"): Transmits to all SM. Good for orders, orientation, contact reports and almost everything related to squad communication which can not be cover using local.
    • SL Radio ("*" to transmit to all SL, "Num 1 ->9" for squad specific communication): SL to SL communication. Transmitting to every SL is useful to send important information to essentially everyone in a short amount of time. Remember that this should be saved for information which is actually relevant to all squads, such as when mortars are ready for fire missions, or if you've spotted some sneaky ploy, set by the enemy, which can ruin the whole round. Squad specific radio is essentially for quick and simple communication between two SL's, which can be anything from requesting backup and reporting potential threats to coordinated attacks and status reports.
    • SL to CO radio ("/"): A link between the SL and the CO. Often used to receive and confirm tasks set by the CO. Can also be used for contact reports or any information that the CO might have use of. Also, don't forget to report back to the CO once a task is finished and you're ready for a new one!

    Two things to think about before you start transmitting:
    -What do I want to say? If it's a contact report, try to pin point the location as good as you can. Try to formulate your message before you open you month.
    -Who does it concern? A incoming enemy APC is relevant information for your squad, but it can also be relevant for any neighboring squads. At the same time, it's most likely not relevant for ALL squads, so check who's affected.

    Some standard SL-SL phrases and their meaning
    Except sounding a little bit tactic00l (or unnecessarily serious ), most military lingo does actually have a purpose. As I've stated in the beginning: These phrases only necessary when you're not familiar with your team. When playing with friends (or known enemies), "Yo, AssKiller334, pick me up, will ya?" works just as well as "Squad 2, this is squad 4. Requesting airlift, over".

    Even if you're using the squad specific channel, every message should start with you stating who you are and who you're contacting.

    ---

    Messages should follow this standard whenever possible:

    "Squad X, this is Squad Y... (Message) ... , over"

    Squad Y's SL will know who said something, what was said and that the message is over and SL X is awaiting reply. The "over" in the end isn't really that necessary, but it helps telling thereceiver that no more information will be transmitted until he has answered. To confirm that you've heard and understood the message, a simple "Roger/Copy/Got it" as reply is enough.

    Example:
    "Squad 3, this is squad 6. You got a enemy tank coming in from the west, over"
    "Squad 6, this is squad 3. Got it"


    ---

    Maybe you're providing overwatch for a squad that is involved in a CQC and you want to inform them that an enemy squad is slowly advancing towards them. The problem is this case is that the SL who's fighting is most likely pretty occupied. What you can do in this situation is a extended version of the standard mentioned above.

    "Squad X, this is squad Y. Message, over"
    "Squad Y, this is squad X. Hold" / "Hold"

    ...
    "Squad Y, this is squad X. Send, over"
    "Squad X, this is squad Y. ... (Message) ..., over"
    "Squad Y, this is squad X. Roger"


    This might feel like overkill, but there's a though behind it. By just stating that Y has a message for X, but not just directly saying it, Y indicates that it's not urgent. X, currently occupied with other things, responds with "Hold", meaning that he'll get back to Y once things have settled and he can receive the message. This can also be used if you're getting a command from CO, but your SM are currently clogging up the squad radio with chatter.

    "Squad 8, this is squad 3. Message, over"
    "Hold. Under attack"
    ...
    "Squad 3, this is squad 8. Send, over"
    "Squad 8, this is squad 3. Requesting mortar strike in A4, kpd 2, soft targets in open field, over"
    "Squad 3, this is squad 8. Firing 3 times 3 airburst. Stand clear"
    ---


    Sometimes you'd like to stress a certain piece of information, maybe a immediate threat or such. In these cases, you can use "... Be advised, ...". This indicates that any following information is of highest priority and additional attention should be paid to get it right.

    "Squad X, this is squad Y. Be advised, ... (Message)..., over"
    "Squad Y, this is squad X. Roger"

    Use this phrase sparsely, otherwise it'll lose its meaning.

    Example: "Squad 2, this is squad 5. Be advised, you have multiple enemy squads coming in from South, over"
    "Squad 5, this is squad 2. Right, getting the fuck out of here"

    ---


    All of this can also be applied to squad level communication, not just SL-SL/CO. Being consistent with this method is a good way to improve your overall communication skill.

    Communicating on the squad radio
    A good radio discipline is also critical on a smaller scale. As a SL, this will be your most used tool, so having a efficient and clear usage of the squad radio is of uttermost importance. As a SM, this radio is what you'll need to pay the most attention to. Unfortunately, it's quite easy to misuse this channel for social banter between rounds, simply because in a squad with good spacing, you can't reach everyone using Local Speech.

    Common SL commands

    "Clear coms!" -Whenever you need the squad radio to be silent, don't hesitate to raise your voice.

    "Clear coms" is understood by most players, and can be used if you're receiving orders, communicating with other SL's or if the squad radio is getting flooder with random chatter. If SM don't stop talking over squad radio, make sure they understand that you want them to be silent. If that doesn't work, a kick might be in place. Disobeying order and misuse of the squad radio brings down the overall effectiveness of the squad and should be avoided.

    "... Take point." -It's not always ideal to be leading from the front. By ordering a player to "take point", it's his task to go first during movement, finding the ideal pathway and making sure it's safe to proceed. It puts some responsibility on that player, but you can help him out by putting down markers ahead of you, making sure leads where you want him to.

    "On me!" -A handy order in stressed situations, "On me" is kind of the opposite of "... Take point". Simply put, you orders the squad to follow your lead, which can be used well if you want to flank a close by enemy or just need the squad to get to a specific point in short time.

    "Form column" -Often used in conjunction with "On me", "Form column" means that the squad will move in a column. The column formation is not ideal for fighting (it's actually one of the worst, with only one gun in front), it's a good form during sneaky maneuvers, and is also one of the easiest formation for the SM to follow.

    "Form a line" -A line in this case means that you want your squad spread out on your left and right side. A good formation for sweeping through open areas, such as forest, and also the best formation if you're expecting contact up front, since you have maximum amount of guns pointing forward. Usually quite hard to get working with pubbies, mind you.

    "Flank east/west/left right" -Flanking in itself is a very basic movement, but still a very effective one. The general idea is to attack the enemy from a position they didn't expect, thus gaining a advantage. Whenever you use compass direction or left/right is totally depending on the situation. In urban areas, left/right can be more intuitive, whilst compass makes more sense in dense forest. You can also add "... On me!", thus meaning that you'll lead the team a certain way. Also, if you have contacts way ahead of you, you can say "Flank deep, east", meaning that the team should take a longer way towards the enemy.

    Using the squad radio as a SM
    There's not much more to say about this subject that a few tips.

    -When calling out a contact, say things in order of importance. The reasoning behind this is to reduce the necessary reaction time of the squad. Most of the time, this is the most relevant order:
    1. Direction. Where is the contact? ("West!", "Contact, Three, Six, Five!")
    2. Sort. What type of contact? ("Enemy squad", "APC, moving in!")
    3. Distance. How far away? ("200 meters", "Close!")
    4. Position. Where is the contact in relation to the surrounding? ("In the bushes!", "In the left window, third floor!")
    5. Action. What is the contact doing? ("Moving South on road", "Spotting us")
    Example: "Contact! Two hundred, enemy tank, far away by the palms, engaging friendly APC".

    Now, this is not an order set in stone. For instance, if you're guarding the stairs in a T-building and a enemy slips through, it's more important that telling the squad the contact is close than both the direction and the sort of contact ("Contact close!").

    This guide is written by Flix Member and leader of Spearhead, all credits go and belong to Flix
    Last edited by a moderator: Aug 24, 2015
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    Mattytoosack Mattytoosack I love cock on my face

    Events AREA 94

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    I believe when you use * to talk to all squads commander can hear that too.
    Clund and tobi-the-fraggel like this.
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    PRTA

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    You shouldn't really say "Squad" when communicating to a specific leader to keep things simple

    "2 this is 5 [MESSAGE], over*"



    *Over is usually unnecessary but optional



    Great guide BTW
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    Flix Flix SH posterboy

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    Most players seems to realize that after a round or two. :smile:
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    1. Ememy location
    2. Ememy type
    3. Ememy status
    These three are only thing that you need to speak on squad leader's channel.
    Don't speak so much.
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    fecht_niko fecht_niko POV Leader

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    Its too casual, should be more milsim in my opinion!
    rPoXoTauJIo likes this.
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    ok use this every time when you speak on mumble
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    PRTA

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    I died

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